Call for Papers: World Association for the History of Veterinary Medicine 2014

RHN 166/2013 | Call

Organiser: British Veterinary History Society

10-13 September 2014, Imperial College, London

Deadline: 31 January 2014

41st Congress of the World Association for the History of Veterinary Medicine (WAHVM)

Does your research address the intersections between human and animal health? Or the role of animals in war? Or anything to do with the history of veterinary medicine (broadly construed)?

If so, then please consider proposing an abstract for the 2014 congress of the World Association for the History of Veterinary Medicine, to be held at Imperial College London on September 10-13. The call for papers is now open at www.veterinaryhistorylondon.com. The deadline is 31 January 2014.

This meeting routinely attracts well over 100 delegates from over 20 countries. Up to 10 student bursaries are available.

Congress themes

While papers are welcomed an all aspects of veterinary history (broadly defined), two key themes have been identified for the congress:

History of One Health

In the last five years, efforts to integrate human, animal and environmental health has accelerated under the banner of ‘One Health.’ But while this term is new, there is a long history of efforts to connect these arenas, and to bring human and veterinary medicine into closer alignment. Investigating this history not only promises to illuminate the current drive for One Health; it will also reveal the importance of animals and their diseases to the history of human medicine, society and the economy. Possible topics for examination include: the history of zoonotic diseases, comparative medicine, veterinary public health, antimicrobial resistance, the animal as research tool, veterinary-medical relationships, examples of particular individuals and institutions that exemplify the One Health Approach, and the recent history of One Health.

Key note speaker: Professor Donald Frederick Smith, Professor of Surgery and Dean Emeritus, Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine: ‘The Three Parts of One Health: Zoonosis, Comparative Medicine and Zoeyia

War, Animals & the Veterinary Profession

In the centenary year of the outbreak of World War I, it is timely to reflect on the multiple roles played by animals and the veterinary profession in wars throughout history. Possible topics of enquiry include: the changing uses of animals in warfare, and associated ethical and welfare concerns; the acquisition of animals for military purposes; their training, transport, breeding and management in health and disease; human-animal relationships in wartime contexts; the memorialisation of animals in warfare; the wartime activities of veterinary surgeons; the roles of animal charities and protection societies; the relationship between war and the development of veterinary knowledge and institutions.

Key note speaker: Dr Hilda Kean Ruskin College, Oxford: ‘Animals in wartime Britain: The Home Front

Source: www.veterinaryhistorylondon.com